US Stocks Down Sharply 2 Days In A Row

After the huge sell-off yesterday and further losses in Asian and European markets, U.S. stocks fell again Thursday at the opening bell. The Dow dropped 130 points before recovering and climbing toward positive territory. Later in the day, though, stocks headed lower. On Wednesday, the Dow plunged more than 830 points as investors worried that rising interest rates might slow economic growth. The Federal Reserve has been gradually raising interest rates to less stimulative levels in response...

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About 100 people gathered in Columbus Circle Monday morning for the annual wreath laying ceremony to honor Christopher Columbus and the contributions of Syracuse’s Italian community.   The event began with the Italian national anthem sung by students of the Josephine Federico school of music. 

The celebration comes amid a growing effort to also mark “Indigenous people’s Day.”  Gardino says it’s not intended to disrespect Native Americans. 

President of the American Italian Heritage Association Frank Ricciardiello acknowledges Columbus’ flaws.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

Hurricane Michael is expected to strengthen rapidly over the next 24 to 36 hours and will be "a dangerous major hurricane when it reaches the northeastern Gulf Coast on Wednesday," the National Hurricane Center says.

The storm achieved hurricane status with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph Monday morning, triggering warnings of a life-threatening storm surge that could hit the Florida Gulf Coast. Later in the day, its sustained winds topped 90 mph, with stronger gusts.

Football coaches often talk about how important it is two excel in all three phases of the game. That's Offense, Defense and the often overlooked Special Teams. For Syracuse University football, a considerable amount of their early success can be atttributed to their strong play on special teams.

This week on The Best of WAER Sports Podcast, WAER's Drew Carter takes a look at some of the players making a difference on special teams so far this year.

New laws in Europe and California are forcing tech companies to protect users' privacy or risk big fines.

Now, the industry is fearing that more states will enact tough restrictions. So it's moving to craft federal legislation that would pre-empt state laws and might put the Federal Trade Commission in charge of enforcement.

Europe enacted a tough law in May which requires, among other things, that companies make data breaches public within 72 hours of discovering them.

Justice Brett Kavanaugh became the newest associate justice of the Supreme Court when he was sworn in Saturday evening.

On Tuesday morning, he will sit to the left of Justice Elena Kagan, in the most junior spot on the high court's bench, and will hear arguments in three criminal cases before the court.

Here's a quick look at some key information about Kavanaugh as he begins his lifetime appointment to the court.

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Down 44-37 in overtime after the Syracuse defense gave up a three-yard touchdown run on the first drive of the period, Eric Dungey started from the Pittsburgh 25 looking to extend the game.  

He would only run one play.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

Report: Most schools now have high-speed internet access

40.7 million students have gained access to high-speed Internet over the last five years. That's according to EducationSuperHighway, a nonprofit dedicated to closing the digital divide in American classrooms. There are still 2.3 million students unconnected, according to the group's most recent annual report.

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Onondaga Community College has been awarded a $3 million federal grant to help low-income students succeed. Out of the 10,000 students on campus, three-quarters of OCC’s first time students are identified as low-income.


Editor's note: This story contains language some may find offensive.

The allegations of drinking and sexual misconduct swirling around Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have prompted a new round of soul-searching at elite prep schools like the one he attended three decades ago. Schools are taking a hard look at how they may have permitted a culture of drinking and sexual misconduct.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

More than 95% of those who go into jail or prison after being convicted and sentenced for a crime come out.  Ex inmates find barriers to work, affordable and safe housing, and dealing with mental health and possible addiction problems.   They’ve served their sentence, paid their debt to society.  Yet the prospect of poverty is all too real for those coming out.  Is this due to lack of community resources? … a built-in continued punishment even after serving their sentence?  … other personal challenges that need to be managed in order to avoid poverty, or a return to crime and more incarceration? 

Chris Bolt reports that help exists, such as a Re-entry Program through the Center for Community Alternatives in Syracuse, but it’s still a tricky road to navigate to beat poverty and the possibility of more crime and incarceration. 


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Hear the latest on the poverty crisis gripping the Syracuse community.