SCSD

John Smith/WAER News

Students are Back to School this week in the Syracuse area.  For some, part of summer vacation was spent learning through activities that introduced them to new areas of study and career fields.  The Syracuse City School District has significantly expanded their career-focused education in P-TECH and C-TECH programs to engage students and held summer internships.  Meanwhile, a new charter school, OnTECH High School opened this week and is not career specific and allows students to determine their own interests.  WAER’s John Smith takes us on a journey through the programs and talks with edu

nysed.gov

The state education department has announced it made an error in the distribution of some federal funding that favored the state’s charter schools over public schools.


Cameron Tirado / WAER News

Students and staff at Franklin Elementary School in Syracuse unveiled a brand new playground with a ribbon cutting Tuesday morning, complete with a countdown.


Scott Willis / WAER News

Syracuse’s P-tech school at the Institute of technology received a guest Monday that they hope will champion the program on a national level. 

First daughter and presidential advisor Ivanka Trump praised the school, local colleges, and business partners for their roles in preparing the local workforce.

Ms. Trump hosted a roundtable discussion to learn more about how the specialized high school curriculum connects students to local companies through mentorships and job shadowing, which could lead to future jobs. 

About 90 Franklin Elementary School 3rd graders had a chance Thursday to get their feet wet and learn a bit about the environment in their own back yards.

Scott Willis / WAER News

Syracuse City high school students Monday were invited to share thoughts about their schools, and some suggestions as part of the third annual student voices symposium.  Concerns ranged from school safety…to what’s served for lunch.

If you ask 11th grader Jean-Baptiste Rakotoarison, and 10th grader Ridwan Sirad, they’ll tell you that PSLA at Fowler is a safe school.  Their concerns seem to revolve around resources for students.  The school has the poorest high school population in the city, and Rakotoarison says most students are left out of some activities.

SCSD's $24 Million Budget Deficit Might Not be as Bad as it Seems

Feb 27, 2018
SyracuseCitySchools.com

A gap of $24 million in the Syracuse City School district budget might not sound good.  But Chief Financial Officer Suzanne Slack says it’s actually smaller than past years. 

"We usually have between a $30 and $40 million gap each year that we work to close through the budget process. When we came in under 30 we were a little bit excited about that. It's still a problem, but to know that it's going in the right direction was a bit of a surprise." 

Taylor Epps / WAER News

Getting children to think about recess is easy, but getting them to start thinking about college may not be as simple. Onondaga Community College and the Syracuse City School District are working together to plant a seed in students’ minds early. Superintendent Jaime Alicea and O-C-C President Casey Crabill say the partnership will give kids more opportunities.

"One of our goals in the Syracuse City School District is to graduate our students to be college and career ready.  Exposing the students to college at an early age will provide them with opportunities."

Scott Willis / WAER News

Thursday marked the first day on the job for Jaime Alicea as the new superintendent of the Syracuse city schools.   The Board of Education voted unanimously Wednesday night to remove the word “interim” from his title.

Alicea says he never thought he’d become superintendent when the Puerto Rican native  began as a kindergarten teaching assistant at Seymour Elementary in 1983.

syracusecityschools.com

The Syracuse City School District’s four-year graduation rate took a big jump last year.  Numbers released Friday by the state education department show nearly 61 percent of students graduated last year…a 6.4 four percent increase over 2015.  That compares to a more modest 1.3 percent increase statewide to 79.4 percent.  Interim Superintendent Jaime Alicea says the district’s strategy to cater to the needs of individual students has been working.

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