Brett Neely

Brett Neely is an editor with NPR's Washington Desk, where he edits coverage of elections, campaign finance, government ethics, and voting rights. He also works closely with member station reporters to coordinate political coverage.

Neely came to NPR in 2015 and worked closely with a team of member station reporters throughout the 2016 election cycle as part of NPR's ongoing initiative to deepen its editorial ties with stations. After the 2016 election, he worked with member station colleagues to deepen coverage of state government and politics for local and national audiences.

Before coming to NPR, Neely was a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio News, based in Washington, where he covered Congress and the federal government for one of public radio's largest newsrooms. Between 2007 and 2009, he was based in Berlin where he worked as a freelance reporter for multiple outlets. He got his start in journalism as a producer for the public radio show Marketplace.

Neely graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Occidental College in Los Angeles with a bachelor's degree in international relations. He also received a master's degree in international relations from the University of Chicago. He is a fluent German speaker.

A day after de facto Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump said "there's nothing to learn" from making his tax returns public before this November's elections, the billionaire is taking heat from the party's 2012 nominee over that stance.

After Bernie Sanders lost four of the five presidential primaries Tuesday night, the Democratic hopeful's campaign is laying off many staffers.

Noting that 80 percent of the nominating contests have been completed, Sanders spokesman Michael Briggs said in a statement that "we no longer require many of the loyal and dedicated state and national support staffers who helped us."

It appears that the attacks on presidential candidate Donald Trump's business record seem to have touched a nerve.

Despite three more primary and caucus victories on Tuesday, Trump eschewed a traditional victory speech, adding in a press conference — and something else: a table piled high with a veritable Trump-ucopia of Trump-branded products.

"I have very successful companies," the New York billionaire told reporters at the event at Trump National Golf Club Jupiter, in Jupiter, Fla., as raw steaks, bottles of wine and vodka, and magazines stood near the man himself.

The most recent Republican presidential nominee is taking shots at Donald Trump's fitness to be president.

And he's not mincing his words.

Mitt Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, called the current GOP front-runner "a phony, a fraud" in a speech Thursday morning in Salt Lake City. And he didn't stop there.

After taking fire from all sides of the political spectrum for not condemning an endorsement from a white supremacist leader, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump blamed the incident on a "very bad earpiece" used in a cable news interview.

Pages