Kevin Kloss

Content & Operations Manager

 I’ve always been enamored by the allure of radio. Maybe it was because my father worked in radio. Maybe it was the personal connection I felt with the hosts on the microphone. Whatever it was, I’ve been hooked on it for as long as I can remember. From Sports Talk, to Public Radio storytelling, to Alternative Rock I always found something different about each format that I appreciate. 

 As a student at Onondaga Community College in 2008 I had the opportunity to intern with Gomez and Dave on TK99 and I learned so much about the craft of putting together a successful morning show. I finished up my Radio Production degree at SUNY Fredonia, as an active member of their student radio program, hosting a weekly sports talk show.

 In 2011 I started working for the Mars Hill Network in Syracuse as their Morning Show Sports Announcer and ended up working as their Traffic Manager. Eventually I would transition into their Program Director and after nearly six years at the network I accepted a position with WAER. As someone who has enjoyed storytelling podcasts for years joining WAER has been a true pleasure. The opportunity to share stories from members of a community that has been my home for nearly my entire life was what drew me to WAER. 

  When I’m not poking around the radio station I enjoy taking day trips with my wife Chelsea and our son Jack.  

Ways to Connect

On August 14th, 2016, San Francisco Quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem for the first time. Since that day there have been numerous public gestures done in protest of police brutality. Kaepernick's protest is certainly the most well-known, but it wasn't the first.

On this episode of Afro Futures, Yusuf Abdul-Qadir chats with Toni Smith-Thompson, Senior Organizer at the New York Civil Liberties Union. Toni is also well known for her protest of the national anthem during a college basketball game at Manhattanville College in 2003. 

Yusuf and Toni discuss the importance of the right to protest, how things have changed since 2003, and what things should look like moving forward.

 


With the Academy Awards having come and gone and the Emmys looming in September, movies and films are on the minds of many of us right now. What makes a movie powerful? And what do they say about our society?

On this week's episode of Afro Futures, Yusuf Abdul-Qadir and Latavius Murraywill discuss three recent movies that have a lot to say about black  representation  and the way the African American community is viewed.


On Tuesday April 20th 2021, jurors came to a verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin.The jury found him guilty on all three charges, in a ruling that made headlines all across the country.

On this episode of Afro Futures, Yusuf Abdul-Qadir sits down to look back on the trial, give some historical perspective, and share his thoughts on what the ruling means moving forward.

  

Too often athletes are told to "stay in their lane" and "stick to sports" when they attempt to branch outside the arena of athletics. Recently, NBA Superstar Lebron James was given such treatment for his attempt to push forward change in the areas of social justice and racial equality.

On this episode of Afro Futures, Yusuf Abdul-Qadir and Lavatius Murray, discuss the importance of athletes being able to use their platforms for change. Why do others feel it's alright to tell athletes where they can be vocal? Are professional athletes always comfortable to speak out? And how does the NFL compare to the NBA in terms of social change?'


Shutterstock – Hurricanehank

Rap artist Earl Simmons, better known as DMX, whose music dominated the charts in the 1990’s and early 2000’s passed away after spending days on life support.  On this episode of Pop Life, host Joe Lee reflects on the artist's career and the impact of his music had on the hip-hop genre. 


Out of  a need for authentic conversations about issues facing the black community comes a new podcast from WAER, Afro Futures.  Hosts Yusuf Abdul-Qadir and Latavius Murray bring context and nuance to important conversations. The podcast  aims to cover culture, politics, sports, and everything in between from a Black perspective.

  

As the nation has grappled with a pandemic, the cries for racial and social justice have also grown in solidarity.  On this episode of City Limits: Winds of Change, how are places of higher education responding to ensure diversity, equity and inclusion?  How are they dealing with bias, racial issues and ethnic attacks?  

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presents the 93rd Academy Awards on April 25, 2021.  Is your favorite feature film of 2020 on the list?  Don’t fret if you haven’t seen all or most of them because on this episode of Pop Life, Joe Lee sits with Kendall R. Phillips, professor in the department of Communications and Rhetorical Studies in the College of Visual & Performing Arts at Syracuse University and author of the books Controversial Cinema: The Films that Outraged America and Projected Fears: Horror Films and American Culture to discuss this year’s slate of nominated films.  The two chat about the films within the context of diversity and inclusion, the global pandemic, and video streaming platforms.

  

If you have ever suffered the loss of a pet and felt that people did not truly understand your grief, then actress, singer Reagan Pasternak (HBO’s “Sharp Objects”, Netflix “Being Erica”, BET’s “Ms. Pat”) wants you to know that you are not alone.  In her new book, Griffin’s Heart, Pasternak provides readers with interactive tools, healing exercises, and encouragement to help them navigate grief and honor the life of their beloved family pet.


Disney

There's been a lot of hype surrounding the Marvel/Disney+  original show Wandavision. Comic book enthusiasts have been soaking up ever episode filled with "easter eggs" and throwbacks to the original Marvel comics. But, for casual fans of the MCU, they've been left asking a lot of questions and unsure of where to turn for answers. 

To help answer those questions Joe Lee welcomes marvel and comic book aficionado Tessa Smith to Pop Life.  They discuss the origin story of lead character Wanda Maximoff, the importance of this series within the future of the MCU, and why the non-geek should dive into this limited series.


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