Diversity

If you've ever felt the burden of needing to decide what you want to eat before heading out to dinner, you're not alone. But, if things continue to progress the way they seem, that won't be a problem for Syracuse residents next year.

The Salt City Market is scheduled to open in the fall of 2020, offering a food hall with culinary options as diverse as the city itself. On this episode of The 315, Joe Lee and Kevin Kloss chat with Market Manager, Adam Sudmann and two potential venders about how the food hall could impact the Syracuse area. 


There's a lot that goes into the makeup of any city. When we stop to think about the city of Syracuse a diverse array of cultures should hopefully come to mind. This week on The 315 Joe Lee and Kevin Kloss chat with Victoria Coit, Founder and Director of Operations and Business Development for Cuse Culture.  

The three chat about how the organization hopes to impact the culture of Syracuse, how they're encouraging local young professionals and about their upcoming festival.


Juhanna Rogers

March is Women's History Month and WAER is bringing it's celebration to The 315. For this special episode WAER's Katie Zilcosky and Cora Thomas chat with Dr. Juhanna Rogers, creator of the web series, "Behind the Women."

They'll chat about what inspired her to start this series, what makes Syracuse women special, and what role she hopes to play in the community.

WAER and Hendricks Chapel recently hosted an on-air, round-table discussion on Trevor Noah’s “Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood”.  The book was selected for the 2018-19 Syracuse Reads Program, a shared reading initiative coordinated by the Provost’s Office that is part of the First-Year Experience for all new Syracuse University students.

Hosted by WAER General Manager Joe Lee and the Rev. Brian Konkol, dean of Hendricks Chapel, the round table conversation also included four first-year students—Bryan Hudnell, Dassy Kemedjio, Hadiya Lee and Allison Weiss—focusing on themes of identity and belonging, spirituality, and diversity and inclusion.


Molly Bolan/WAER News

The 27th annual Westcott Street Cultural Fair on Sunday drew tens of thousands of residents to the main road for six stages of music and dancing, more than seventy booths for artisan goods, and a diverse selection of food. But this was no ordinary street fair. Sharon Sherman, Chair of the Westcott Fair, says the festivities were a celebration of all the neighborhood has accomplished, and what it has become.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

The latest chapter in Syracuse University’s response to the racist and offensive material in a fraternity’s video was to have a speak-out addressing as wide range of issues around bias and inclusion.  Top officials from S-U were there to hear a list of six main demands by students.  Sophomore Jo Johnson read the list, which started with a review of the entire Greek system…plus hire more faculty from marginalized communities.

During week one of the NFL season fans were treated to a landmark event. Two minority head coaches made their debut in the same game as the Broncos and Chargers went head to head.

In college football, Dino Babers is one of 15 minority head coaches in 128 division one football programs. And, he is the only minority head coach in the ACC.

This week on The Best of WAER Sports Podcast, Drew Carter examines the state of minority coaches in football. 

Photography by Jacqui Ipp

Reid Hoffman is back this week with another episode of Masters of Scale. One of his guests this week is Google's Eric Schmidt.

Google has succeeded by innovating again and again. Not just search, but GMail and GoogleDocs and even self-driving cars. Their secret? They don’t tell their employees how to innovate; they manage the chaos. Eric Schmidt—CEO of Google since 2001 and now Chairman of parent company Alphabet—shares the controversial management techniques he created to cultivate an environment of free-flowing ideas plus disciplined decision making that lead to breakthrough ideas.