Interstate 81

Shane Lavalette

A temporary exhibit at ArtRage gallery shows the past and present realities of the land where the Interstate 81 viaduct now exists side by side. Organizers of 'A Shadow Cast: Interstate 81' Shane Lavalette and the New York Civil Liberties Union hope the photos help to explain why restorative justice should be a necessary part of the I-81 Project.

 


Katie Zilcosky / WAER News

A new exhibit at ArtRage Gallery brings the current photography of Shane Lavalette into the same room as historic photography from Marjory W. Wilkins. Both of them photographing Syracuse, in the area where Interstate 81 now stands, but at different times.


Daniel Lobo / Wikimedia Commons

Mayor Ben Walsh wants the Interstate 81 project to prioritize the communities adjacent to the viaduct and local workforce development. In a presentation during GreeningUSA’s Green Bag Lunch series Friday, Walsh said one of the key issues that will affect those living right next to the interstate is displacement.


Scott Willis / WAER News

The state Department of Transportation officials overseeing the planned street grid to replace Interstate 81 viaduct in Syracuse took time Wednesday to clarify some details and stress the benefits of the nearly $2 billion project.  The recommendation came Monday as part of a 15,000 page report on the project’s social, economic, and environmental impacts.


File Photo

 This is a developing story and will be updated.

The New York State Department of Transportation released its long awaited Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Monday and named the Community Grid as its preferred alternative. The DOT says the decision was made after considering social, econoimc, and environmental effects as well as the need for safe and efficient transportation. 


Scott Willis/WAER News

Syracuse University Chancellor Kent Syverud is officially coming down on the side of the Community Grid Option for replacing Interstate 81.  His announcement Friday indicates the decision was made only after a great deal of research on the implications of each potential choice.  But now, with the draft environmental impact statement expected from the state, Syverud thought it time to lend his and the University's clout behind one of the options.

Majority Support Keeping I-81's Current Route, New Poll Shows

Dec 6, 2016
Scott Willis

A group that wants to keep Interstate 81 – or at least its path – through downtown Syracuse has some new support for its position. A new poll by the group Save 81 showed that the majority of respondents support keeping the highway’s current route. Spokesperson Mark Nicotra said past surveys have showed that people are in favor of keeping 81 running through the city, and they wanted to feel the public’s temperature once again.

“We want to see it that still was the thought process and we thought it might be and we are certainly excited to see that it was.”

Scott Willis / WAER News

An observer of population trends and urban issues says Syracuse appears to be on the right path toward making its downtown a more thriving place.

Matt Carmichael is editor of livability.com, and was the keynote speaker at Wednesday’s annual meeting of the Downtown Committee. 

Downtown Committee Executive Director Merike Treier says downtown's growth seems to be spreading or strenghening nearby neighborhoods previously disconnected from the city's core, like the Inner Harbor and Franklin Square. 

A number of experts will be coming to the Syracuse area over the next few months to share their experiences with transportation projects on a scale similar to what’s ahead for Interstate 81.  The series is being organized and co-sponsored by the city, county, and state. County Executive Joanie Mahoney expects the experts will be a wealth of information.  Mahoney says the speakers are intended to complement the displays and materials at the Carnegie library on Columbus Circle where people can stop in at their leisure to learn more about the options and process.

Pages