Job Training

Onondaga Community College

An on-the-job apprenticeship training program is about to launch to fill the gaps for a lack of qualified talent in Central New York for machinists and toolmakers.  Onondaga Community College is partnering with two local companies to offer the free on the job training. 


It might seem like one of the quickest ways out of poverty is a steady job.  But despite low unemployment and government-funded job training, those who need jobs the most find obstacles to getting them.  Some built-in factors get in the way but there are policies and practices that could hold promise.  In this episode of City Limits, Chris Bolt examines the role local businesses play in reducing poverty in Syracuse.


Scott Willis / WAER News

Syracuse’s P-tech school at the Institute of technology received a guest Monday that they hope will champion the program on a national level. 

First daughter and presidential advisor Ivanka Trump praised the school, local colleges, and business partners for their roles in preparing the local workforce.

Ms. Trump hosted a roundtable discussion to learn more about how the specialized high school curriculum connects students to local companies through mentorships and job shadowing, which could lead to future jobs. 

file photo / WAER News

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand says she has a bi-partisan solution to improve access to job training programs that could help New Yorkers land better-paying jobs.  Companies in Central New York and elsewhere often say they have openings, but can’t find workers with the skills they need.

Sen. Gillibrand says 5.8 million jobs nationwide go unfilled because of a shortage of workers with in-demand skills.  But she says simply telling workers to get training misses the larger picture.

Organization Uses Federal Grant to Help Syracuse Refugees Find Jobs

Dec 11, 2014
(c) John Smith, WAER.

The Somali Bantu Community Association has received a $450,000 Federal grant to support self-sufficiency and provide employment services to the Somali Bantus, as well as other refugees in the Syracuse area. Self-sufficiency is a top priority for the association, which works to assist the refugees along their path toward becoming United States citizens. 

Haji Adan, Executive Director of the association, says the group’s mission is to facilitate a successful transition to American life.

Scott Willis / WAER News

Senator Charles Schumer stopped by the Ultra Dairy plant in East Syracuse Monday to promote an initiative he hopes will teach new skills needed to land advanced  manufacturing jobs in Central New York.   The State University of New York has applied for a $15 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to support a career training program.  If approved, the funding would go to Onondaga Community College and nearly 30 other SUNY schools, in addition to local businesses like Byrne Dairy. Schumer says that jobs in mechatronics are more advanced than traditional manufacturing jobs because they require skills in engineering, mechanics and electronics.  He gives an example of how it might work:

Chris Bolt/ WAER News

A group of Syracuse residents will be the first class in an urban and minority training program that promises to give them a pathway to a better job or out of unemployment.