refugees

Mary Catalfamo/NextGenRadio

Hamdi Farah knew in college that she wanted to be a teacher for the younger refugee children in Syracuse’s Somali-American community, but she had doubts about the idea. How could she teach them English, for example, when she wasn’t always sure of correct spellings herself?


Malika-Budur Kalila/NextGenRadio

Aromas of curry, cumin, turmeric, onions and other spices fill the room as goat curry cooks in a huge pot on the stove. Meanwhile, various dishes from cuisines around the world are served to customers.  “It’s a blessing to feed people who were fasting the whole day; it’s a really beautiful benefit from God,” says Tatyana Mahmud.


Stacy Fernandez/NextGenRadio

It’s Christmas in May in Jan-Juba Arway’s house. A “Happy Holidays” decal adorns a wall in the living room with five stockings around it, one for Arway and each of her kids. A Christmas tree topped by a glittery gold star anchors a corner of the room.


Syracuse Resident Camps Out at Southern Border to Assist Asylum Seekers

Nov 30, 2018
Provided photo / Sheila Sicilia

A Syracuse woman has traveled more than 2,700 miles to the southern border near Tijuana to support the Central Americans seeking asylum in the United States.  The Trump administration is sending 15,000 troops to the border in an effort to stop the so-called “caravan” from entering the US.  WAER News caught up with Sheila Sicilia via a shaky phone line, and she says the migrants are fleeing dictators and violence that have been perpetuated by decades of flawed US policy. 

Refugee Center Open House Will Shows Off Changes

May 9, 2018
Chris Bolt/WAER News

A center that helps refugees settle into Syracuse wants the community to know more about what they do and about the new Americans they help. The RISE center might have a few surprises. 

“The biggest myth, of course, that’s continually propagated is that refugees are just here to collect social services and basically feed off of taxpayers.”           

Local Ethiopian Chef Shares Her Love Of Food And Cooking

Feb 13, 2018
Saniya More / Globalists at Syracuse University

Twice a year in Syracuse an event called My Lucky Tummy invites people from all over the world to cook food from their home country. It’s a celebration of local tastes and international culture. In the latest event, more than 350 people gathered in the basement of a local church to share food from Vietnam, Iran, Laos, Ethiopia, and Savannah. WAER's Kijin Higashibaba brings us the story of the chef from Ethiopia and the people who enjoyed her food.

Chris Bolt/WAER News

The Onondaga County/ Syracuse Human Rights Commission honored International Human Rights Day with speakers at All Saints  Roman Catholic Church that reminded people of violence and discrimination faced by LGBTQ community members, those with disabilities, and people who've immigrated or resettled here from other countries.  Commission Executive Director Barrie Gewanter noted human rights day came out of the International Declaration of human rights adopted in 1948.  

Scott Willis / WAER News

The economic stability of Syracuse and other Rust Belt cities might very well hinge on refugees.  More than 400 people have spent the past two days at the Marriott Syracuse Downtown to attend the Welcoming Economies Convening, a coalition of public and business leaders dedicated to resettling refugees.  Co-Chair Steve Tobocman says that while refugee policy must have its roots in humanitarianism, we also shouldn’t ignore the refugee population’s economic contributions and potential.

Jon Shames / WAER News

Chants for freedom reverberated through the streets of downtown Syracuse Thursday as dozens of activists gathered to urge Congressmember John Katko to co-sponsor what they call a "Clean Dream Act." It’s part of a coordinated nationwide Dream Act Week of Action while Congress is in recess.  Gustavo Andrade is director of leadership development with United We Dream. 

Refugees Pleased That Long-Awaited Soccer Fields are Coming to Schiller Park

Oct 17, 2017
Leo Tully / WAER News

Residents of Syracuse’s Northside are about to get a soccer field, but they’ll have to wait until next spring.  The new fields were unveiled at Schiller Park Tuesday.  The space is large enough to hold two youth-sized or one regulation soccer field.  The sport has been gaining steam throughout the city, thanks to its popularity among the refugee community.  Mayor Stephanie Miner says she realized how important the game is to that community and that it was about time they had a field to play on. 

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