Science on the Radio

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Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin formed the American crew that landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969. While we've learned much about this hisorical event throughout the year, there is still much to learn.

This week on Science on the Radio , Dr Marvin Druger will help fill in the gaps as we expand our knowledge on Apollo 11.


Though considered somewhat rare, Measles is a dangerous and extremely contagious disease that needs to be taken seriously. In early 2019 the disease returned to news headlines as there was a measles outbreak in the Pacific Northwest.

This week on Science on the Radio, Dr Marvin Druger will address the dangerous disease. You'll hear how the disease is the spread, the most common symptoms and the best way to prevent the measles. 


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Throughout casual conversation many of us might make the mistake of referencing a black hole as a segment of empty space. In fact, it is a great amount of matter packed into a very small area.

Have you ever wondered how common black holes are throughout the galaxy? How exactly does a black hole form? And perhaps most importantly, how can scientists detect black holes? No need to continue wondering, as Dr Marvin Druger will answer that and more this week on Science on the Radio.


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It may not carry the same name recognition associated with trees like Pine, Elm, or Maple, but the Ash Tree is quite popular among landscapers or simply those seeking shade. And while you might not be aware of it, they come in a number of shapes and sizes with a unique branch layout.

Dr. Marvin Druger will get to the root of what makes the Ash Tree special, this week on Science on the Radio.


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Each year there are numerous strides made in the scientific arena. 2018 specially, was an exceptional year for space exploration. And at a time when many of us are still writing '2018' on our checks, Dr. Marvin Druger will look back at some of the scientific headlines from the past year. 

Space craft landings,  test satellites and a telescope that surpasses the famed Hubble telescope. All that and more this week on Science on the Radio.


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When it comes to space many of us have a base knowledge about our solar system and the galaxy. But whether it's The Milky Way, blackholes or the chemical makeup of various planets, how much do we really know? Luckily, this week on Science on the Radio, Dr. Marvin Druger will give us additional information to better understand the universe around us and appreciate our existence.


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Over 86% percent of adults in the United States admit to consuming an alcoholic beverage of somekind. And while a stiff drink can be a good way to relax it can also carry some health concerns if not managed properly. This week on Science on the Radio, Dr. Marvin Druger educates us on  some of the finer points of alcohol.

Where in history did consuming alcohol begin? Does aclohol consumption impact the ability to live a long and healthy life? Find out this week on Science on the Radio.


It might not be the best mealtime discussion but, ulcers are sores that can occur in a variety of places. While we've all probably heard about individuals suffering from an ulcer, could you explain what happens to cause them? Never fear, Dr. Marvin Druger will discuss the two main causes of an ulcer this week on Science on the Radio.

You'll also learn about the best ways to treat an ulcer, along with some preventive measures that you can take.


No one would argue that a starfish or a goldfish represents a pictue of superiority, but when it comes to the regenerative process, they have us beat. A starfish can regrow an arm if one is cut off. If the optical nerve of a goldfish is damaged the goldfish will generate a new working nerve.

Things are not as simple for humans when it comes to the regenerative process. This week on Science on the Radio, Dr. Marvin Druger talks about the human body and it's ability to heal wounds. 


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You might often think of it as simply seaweed, but truth be told it's much more than just seaweed. This week on Science on the Radio, Dr Marvin Druger talks about algae. If you've ever gone swimming in some of the less desirable areas then you've probably encountered it a time or two.

Some forms of algae can produce chemicals that are toxic to humans and animals.  Dr. Druger explains more specifically where algae is typically found and side effects to being exposed to it's toxic chemicals.


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