SPD

John Smith / WAER-FM 88.3

It was February 4th, 2018, when then-Syracuse Police Sgt. James Milana pulled up on the scene of a man wielding a gun on South Salina Street near West Calthrop Avenue.  Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul picks up the story…


Scott Willis / WAER News

Youth and community advocacy groups in Syracuse are working with city police to try and bridge gaps between officers and neighborhoods.  The SPD has been making a concerted effort to connect with the residents they serve and nurture more positive interactions. 


Matti Blume

Some Syracuse Common Councilors are questioning what appears to be a trend by the police department to add military hardware to its SWAT team.  The Council voted 6 to 1 this week to accept a $100,000 federal homeland security grant to outfit its 9-ton Bearcat armored vehicle with night vision, ballistic protection search mirrors, a pole camera, tubular assault equipment, among other items.   Jean Kessner cast the lone "no" vote.  She says using military tools and tactics on domestic problems is the wrong approach. 

Syracuse’s 428 police officers are working under a new contract for the first time in more than three years.  Common councilors Monday gave their approval to the five year agreement retroactive to 2011.  Police Benevolent Association President Jeffrey Piedmonte says both city and union negotiators put a lot of work into the talks, which culminated in a agreement in mid-June.  He says health insurance was a key sticking point…the deal calls for officer contributions to more than double starting in September.

John Smith / WAER News

Five police canines and their handlers are ready to hit the streets in their respective communities after graduating Friday from the Syracuse Police Department’s Canine Academy. 

 A ceremony was held  at the Inner Harbor.  SPD Sergeant Tim Stepian has been a K9 handler himself for 24 years and a trainer for 16. 

  Chavez and other officers from Johnson City, Ithaca, and the Troy Police Departments as well as Delaware County Sheriffs spent nine weeks getting to know their dogs and how to give commands.