youth smoking

Scott Willis

Students at Syracuse’s Institute of Technology Wednesday joined others at high schools in Syracuse and across the nation to find ways to create the first tobacco-free generation.  Wednesday’s event was part of the 23rd annual Kick Butts Day.

Dozens of ITC Students tried their hand at the prize wheel as they passed by the cafeteria during lunch periods.  Student assistance counselor Melissa Erlenbeck says they’re trying to empower students…

Tobacco Free Network of CNY

Middle and high school students in Fulton, the Institute of Technology in Syracuse and across the state today called attention to the billions of dollars of tobacco promotion in stores that is likely influencing kids to start smoking at the average age of 13.  Today is Seen Enough Tobacco Day, and students created displays aimed at raising awareness of tobacco placement and advertising.  Joe Wicks is with the Tobacco Free Network of Central New York, and says even pharmacies are partly to blame.

CNY Youth Make the Case for a Tobacco-Free Generation

Jul 20, 2017
Provided Photo/Dianne Patterson / Reality Check

About 150 teens from across the state have just wrapped up an annual summit in Cazenovia that aimed to completely eliminate tobacco use among youth.  The Reality Check event included a number of activities that highlighted tobacco use statistics.  Cortland High School graduate Katie Couture says they have been working on leadership skills and helping their community learn the facts.

betobaccofree.hhs.gov

There’s growing momentum behind a measure that would increase the age to buy tobacco products to 21 in Onondaga County.   The legislation would target the 45 percent of tobacco users in Onondaga County who are between the ages of 18 and 24 in the hopes of curbing the addiction in that age group.  Christopher Owens is the Director for the Center for Tobacco Health Systems at Saint Joseph’s Hospital, one of at least six members of a new workgroup pushing the measure.  He says New York State is already hitting the issue from all sides.

FDA.GOV

Onondaga County’s health commissioner and the American Cancer Society say a recent report issued by the U.S. Surgeon General confirms that more teens are using e-cigarettes and likely getting addicted to nicotine.  Bill Sherman is Vice President of Government Relations with the cancer society out of Albany.   He calls the report a watershed moment that indicates the potential harm of e-cigarettes.

cdc.gov

It appears New York State and Onondaga County have been a few steps ahead of federal law after news Thursday that the Food and Drug Administration was extending its oversight to all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes.  Turns out local laws restricting youth access have been in place for years.