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WAER News Round up: Sept. 26 - 30

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WAER News
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WAER
A graphic of notebook paper lists the top stories of the week of Sept. 26 to 30, 2022.

If you missed the news a few days this week, don't worry. The WAER News Round up has you covered.

This week Governor Hochul appointed the first Native American justice. At the same time, Syracuse Common Councilor Amir Gethers still attended a city voting session after being arrested for domestic violence.

Syracuse is also replacing its aging water and sewer lines before repaving and replacing roads and sidewalks. During the same week, Syracuse Common Council Councilors tossed out a proposed agreement with Waste Management of New York.

Find more of the week's news below:

1. Syracuse Councilor Gethers returns to voting session after domestic violence arrest

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Scott Willis
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WAER
Councilor Gethers reaches over to speak with fellow Councilor, Rasheada Caldwell, during Monday's common council meeting.

Syracuse Common Councilor Amir Gethers still attends voting session after his domestic violence arrest. Gethers was arrested after a woman who identified herself as his ex-girlfriend told police he tried to choke her on two different days.

2 . First Native American appointed to state's Appellate Division

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Ajay Suresh
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Wikimedia Commons
Appellate Division Courthouse of New York State.

Gov. Kathy Hochul appointed the first Native American justice to serve in the state’s appellate division on Thursday.

3. Nursing home worker union objects to new NYS DOH rules on minimum patient care standards

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Pxfuel.Com
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WAER News

Advocates for nursing home workers say the state health department is trying to undermine a law meant to establish minimum staffing requirements.

4. Syracuse fire officials asking city to plan years ahead for new fire engines

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SFD via twitter @syracusefire
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One of Syracuse's ladder trucks

The Syracuse Fire Department warns city leaders of the critical need to replace fire trucks in advance due to supply chain issues and worker shortages.

5. Syracuse's Dig Once approach on roads tackles Butternut/Grant and West Genesee St.

Burnet Roadwork
Scott Willis
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WAER

Cooler temperatures mean road construction season is coming to a close across Central New York in the next few weeks. Onondaga County and the City of Syracuse begin to wrap up this year’s road re-paving projects and prepare for winter.

6. Uncertainty surrounds New York Latino voter turnout for midterms

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Katie Zilcosky
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WAER News

There are concerns about whether Latino voters will turn out as much as they have in past elections as the midterm elections approach.

7. Syracuse officials debate next course of action for trash collection pilot program

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Chris Bolt
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WAER
Bags of trash are seen scattered on the lawn in front of a Syracuse home.

The Syracuse Common Council has thrown out a proposed agreement with a subcontractor for a trash collection pilot program. Still, the city will move toward overhauling its trash collection system by using partially automated trucks with arms.

8.Report finds high rates of toxins released in Oswego watershed

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Dirk Ingo Franke
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Wikimedia Commons
Bridge across the harbor in Oswego, NY.

A nonprofit survey report claims the Anheuser-Busch facility in Baldwinsville is the main contributor to toxic waste inhabiting the Oswego watershed.

9.CNY farmers make it through dry summer to offer pumpkins this fall

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Little Salmon River Farm
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The pumpkin patch at Little Salmon River Farm.

After the drought season of upstate New York in July, which threatened the sell of many seasonal staples, Central New York farmers are nervous about pumpkin picking during seasonal fall activities.

Yoki Tang was raised in a big city of China called Shanghai. He speaks Mandarin, Korean and English. His majors are Broadcast Digital Journalism and Selective Study In Education and would be graduated in May 2023. The desire to get the facts right and the quest for accurate facts made Yoki want to study broadcast and journalism in the first place.