Bald Eagles

Scott Willis / WAER News

Activists are using the occasion of Independence Day to urge Onondaga County and Central New Yorkers to protect the dozens of bald eagles which call Onondaga Lake home during the winter. 


Birds of Prey in the Spotlight at Onondaga Lake Photograph Exhibition This Weekend

Mar 28, 2019
Shantelle Willock / WAER

Central New Yorkers have probably heard about the bald eagles making Onondaga Lake their winter home. But a photo exhibit this weekend aims to show that many other types of birds of prey have also returned to feed and roost at the lake. Onondaga Lake Conservation Corps Director Chris Lajewski says it shows just how far Onondaga Lake has come.

“It used to be the most polluted lake in the country-- no longer.  And we are still getting the word out to the community that it is coming back to life.”

Melissa Osgood / Cornell University

A bald eagle and hawk are recovering after Cornell University wildlife experts say they suffered acute poisoning.  Both were found lethargic and unable to fly, and both are classified by the DEC as threatened in New York State.  Despite the uncertain outlook when they were picked up, both raptors made unexpected recoveries.  Here are their stories, as provided by Cornell media relations:

THE EAGLE

Greg Craybas / http://www.gregcraybasphoto.com/index

 (UPDATE:  The Morning Presentation and Birding Walk has filled; A second session has been added, running 1:00 to 3:00 p.m., also Feb 11th)

Contrary to what many Central New Yorkers might believe about Onondaga Lake’s ecosystem, it has become a winter home for many Bald Eagles. An event coming up February 11th aims to explain why.

(event registration & deadline info below)

Chris Lajewski is director of the Montezuma Audubon Center.

Honeywell

Much of the focus of the Onondaga Lake clean-up project has been on the lake itself with dredging completed last fall and capping operations set to begin this spring.  But there’s also been an effort to clean and restore  44 acres of contaminated  wetlands in the lake’s watershed.  This report takes a closer look at what’s being done…and the wetlands' role in the return of the lake’s ecology. It’s a chilly, early spring day, and we’ve pulled up to where Geddes Brook joins Nine Mile Creek, just across the 695 freeway from the state fairgrounds.    SUNY ESF Professor and Chair of Environmental and Forest Biology Don Leopold says the now meandering brook didn’t always look like this.  Before, it resembled more of a ditch surrounded by a single invasive plant.