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WAER News Round up: May 30-June 3

A graphic features a notebook paper with a list of top stories from the week of May 30-June 3: Leg session wraps up; I-81 final decision, Dems against aquarium; harmful algal blooms; rebuilding CNY arts.
Yoki Tang
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WAER
A graphic features a notebook paper with a list of top stories from the week of May 30-June 3: Leg session wraps up; I-81 final decision, Dems against aquarium; harmful algal blooms; rebuilding CNY arts.

State lawmakers are wrapping up the legislative session as the renovation of I-81 is officially moving forward. Syracuse also receives visit from a candidate for governor makes, and local Democrats speak out against funding a proposed aquarium in Onondaga County.

1. Equal rights amendment protecting abortion rights stalls in final days of legislative session

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WAER File Photo
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WAER File Photo

With the prospect of the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, the New York Legislature has approved several measures to protect abortion providers. However, a proposed equal rights amendment to the state’s constitution guaranteeing a right to the procedure remains stalled.

2. NYS DOT, federal government sign record of decision allowing community grid to replace I-81 viaduct

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Scott Willis
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WAER News
NYS DOT Commissioner Marie Therese Dominguez and I-81 project director Mark Frechette stand near the I-81/I-690 interchange near the Erie Canal Museum.

I-81 Project director Mark Frechette said the move is the final decision on the plan to replace the viaduct with a community grid, which he calls the best decision for the region.

3. NYS gubernatorial hopeful Andrew Giuliani stops in Syracuse to outline his crime prevention plan

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Scott Willis
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WAER News
GOP candidate for governor Andrew Giuliani outlines his crime fighting plan on the steps of Syracuse City Hall during Wednesday's storms.

New York’s gubernatorial primary is less than four weeks away, so the Syracuse area can still expect to see the candidates make campaign stops as they crisscross the state.

4. Onondaga County Democrats say money for proposed aquarium can be better spent

Legislator Bill Kinne is joined by his democratic legislature colleagues in front of the county court house proposing a different way to spend money that is proposed for an aquarium.
Katie Zilcosky
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WAER News
Legislator Bill Kinne is joined by his democratic legislature colleagues in front of the county court house proposing a different way to spend money that is proposed for an aquarium.

They say the budget for an aquarium could instead go toward combating lead poisoning and mental health issues, directly aiding Onondaga County’s families, and addressing the county's long-standing problem of lead poisoning.

5. It's the season to start watching for harmful algal blooms

An aerial image of Skaneateles Lake.
Bill Hecht
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Finger Lakes Land Trust
An aerial image of Skaneateles Lake.

The dozens of tributaries that feed into Skaneateles Lake run the risk of carrying nutrient surges that can fuel harmful algal blooms, particularly in the warmer months.

6. City marks groundbreaking on minority-led development in Syracuse's South Side

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Syracuse Deputy Mayor Sharon Owens speaks to an audience at Salina First's ground breaking event.
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Syracuse Deputy Mayor Sharon Owens speaks to an audience at Salina First's ground breaking event.

A groundbreaking on Syracuse’s South Side will bring a new business venture to the underserved community.

7. Grant program helps CNY artists, organizations continue to try and rebuild from COVID

One of the vendors at the 2012 Arts and Crafts Festival.
Syracuse Downtown Committee
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One of the vendors at the 2012 Arts and Crafts Festival.

CNY Arts was administering the $1.25 million in federal pandemic relief funds allocated by the city for helping artists and organizations continue to rebuild.

Yoki Tang was raised in a big city of China called Shanghai. He speaks Mandarin, Korean and English. His majors are Broadcast Digital Journalism and Selective Study In Education and would be graduated in May 2023. The desire to get the facts right and the quest for accurate facts made Yoki want to study broadcast and journalism in the first place.